TrustArc Blog

The TRUSTe Pioneers and Mavericks Series: Trevor Hughes and Managing Data in the Information Economy

January 14, 2013

Next up in the TRUSTe Privacy Pioneers and Mavericks series is Trevor Hughes. Trevor currently serves as president and chief executive officer of International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), a broad international organization that has contributed to growth of the privacy industry. As an experienced attorney in spheres of technology, marketing and privacy law, he is highly regarded as a thought leader and innovator.

Trevor was amongst the first 50 Chief Privacy Officers in the US and ran privacy for an online advertising company, Engage in 1999. Early on in his career, he realized the potential that the integration of the web into business would lead to legal ramifications. He focused his career by cultivating legal expertise on e-commerce, internet law and, as an offshoot of those areas, privacy.

“I kind of fell into privacy pretty early on—and not by design—but it certainly was something that I became passionate about over the years as the field exploded around me.”

Trevor predicts a new stage of development in the economy and even a revolution.

“Now, we’re looking at the nascent stage of the next big revolution—the information economy. We could argue about whether it’s already 15 years or 10 years or 20 years old, but one way or the other we are at the very beginning. If we look back to the industrial economy, it gave us all sorts of things: a standardized work week, a fixed work day, paid holidays, environmental control and women in the workplace. The societal consequences of the industrial economy were and still are absolutely incredible.
I believe we are so early in the information economy that we don’t yet know exactly how it’s all going to play out. The fundamental challenges of: how we manage the currency of this information economy; how we handle data; how we respect it; how we deal with it, will be central to success and failure in this new economic revolution. And, as a result, the core issue of privacy and privacy- centric professions have nothing but growth ahead for the foreseeable future.”

Access the full interview here.